Anigrand Star Destroyer: Prep work

The Anigrand Star Destroyer resin kit is magnificent. And from what I've read about its construction it's a massive PITA. I bought the Zvezda kit (now available from Revell) a while back but I ended up selling it because I didn't need two large Star Destroyer kits hanging around, and the resin kit featured superior detail, being molded from the filming miniature used in the original Star Wars movie. 

However, the resin kit will be a huge challenge to build. Every part will need a decent level of clean-up, resin is more difficult to work with than plastic, and and resin will require me to build an internal support structure to make sure the model doesn't warp or sag over the coming years. I think I'm ready for this challenge though.

Unpacking the resin.

Unpacking the resin.

The kit is comprised of a large pile of resin pieces and a small photo etch fret. This being a ~20 year old resin kit, the pieces need a lot of work. Amazingly, only a few small details have broken off. A few pieces have large cracks, and one of the pieces broke in half completely, but I don't have to worry about reconstructing a lot of small details.

Trimming and cleaning.

Trimming and cleaning.

I started by using a razor saw to cut off the blocks of resin left over from the molding press. For the larger pieces i went outside and used a Dremel tool to cut them off. Remember to wear a face mask with cutting and sanding resin. Its not the best thing to breath. 

Test fitting parts of the bottom hull.

Test fitting parts of the bottom hull.

I also did some preliminary test fitting. As you can see from the photo above a lot of sanding will be required to ensure a good fit between a lot of the parts. You can also see the old mold release agent dried on the piece on the left. This is why you should always was resin pieces before painting them.

You can see how much warping there was. Not surprising given its age though.

You can see how much warping there was. Not surprising given its age though.

Many of the parts were warped. One of my first tasks was seeing how much they needed to be bent back. I found a piece with the correct angle and made a template from it. I will be using this as a guide for fixing the warped pieces. 

Bath time.

Bath time.

It was finally bath time. I filled my kitchen sink with warm water and dish soap. I let the pieces soak for a few minutes before scrubbing them with a silicone sponge. I set the  clean pieces out on a towel to dry.

Clean, dry, and ready to begin construction.

Clean, dry, and ready to begin construction.

Now that the rough fitting and trimming has been complete it is time to start the detail work. The next post will cover the rough assembly of the model, starting with fixing the watped pieces.